The stories published in William Kennedy’s 1929 "History of Lake County" and the “Story of Mount Dora,” written by R.J. Longstreet, credit Dora Ann Drawdy as Lake Dora's namesake, but they use different timelines for their stories. According to Kennedy, government surveyors were invited to camp at the homestead of the James A. Drawdy and Dora Ann Drawdy “where they were made to feel at home” in 1882. To show their appreciation for the treatment she showed them, the surveyors named the body of water adjoining the homestead Lake Dora in her honor. Kennedy also credits Gen. J.M. Wilcox with naming the town Mount Dora, which was originally called Royellou. Longstreet went into more detail and puts the Drawdys in the area in 1846, a year after Florida was admitted to the Union. According to Drawdy’s grandchildren, they didn’t stop in Mount Dora but staked out a squatter’s claim on the eastern shore of Lake Beauclair and built a pine log cabin. When government surveyors came in 1846 and 1848, the surveyors promised Dora Ann they would name a large lake just to the north in her honor, according to Longstreet’s account. 

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Two authors who disagree with the lake being named after Dora Ann are Walt Sime and Jim Laux. According to Sime, the 1860 Census indicated the Drawdy family did not move to Florida until after 1850, but before 1860. Sime also found evidence that Lake Dora was probably named by 1846. Jim Laux also casts doubts whether Dora Ann is truly the namesake for Lake Dora in his "History of Mount Dora," which published about 15 years ago.

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The small south Lake County community of Taylorville was formed in 1898 when C.C. and B.M. Taylor constructed a turpentine still, quarters for workers and a commissary. But the town's name was changed when A.L. Stuckey, a wealthy Dade City merchant, purchased Taylorville and renamed it Stuckey after himself.