(NAPSI)—More Americans are choosing cruise vacations than ever before. Over 12 million people are expected to cruise out of U.S. ports by the end of 2016, up from 11.3 million in 2015, according to the Cruise Lines International Association (CLIA).

“Cruise lines are committed to environmental best practices and policies,” says Cindy D’Aoust, president and CEO, CLIA. “After all, our business depends on pristine oceans, clean air and beautiful destinations.”

Cruise lines use a number of green technologies to minimize the industry’s environmental impacts.

1. Recycle 60 percent more per passenger than the average person does on land: Some cruise ships even donate used cooking oil to be turned into fuel and turn food waste into steam for laundry facilities.

2. Use LED lighting to reduce power consumption by up to 20 percent: LED lighting lasts 25 times longer, uses 80 percent less energy and generates 50 percent less heat compared to incandescent lightbulbs.

3. Reuse water in a number of ways: Recycled hot water is used to heat passenger cabins. Naturally occurring condensation from shipboard air-conditioning units is reclaimed and reused to wash decks on some cruise ships, saving up to 22.3 million gallons of fresh water annually.

4. Invest in new technologies and cleaner fuels to reduce ships’ air emissions: Billions of dollars are being invested in the development of advanced liquefied natural gas (LNG)–fueled cruise ships that will have lower emissions and higher energy efficiency.

5. Invite passengers to join environmental stewardship efforts: While onboard, passengers are encouraged to participate in resource conservation programs, take environmental education classes, and tour below deck to see firsthand how crewmembers work to reduce and often eliminate waste.

For a free digital copy of CLIA’s Cruise Industry Environmental Sustainability Report, e-mail environment@cruising.org.

On the Net:North American Precis Syndicate, Inc.(NAPSI)