Rachel Scott was only 5-months-old in 1990 and lying in her crib when Robert Eugene Hendrix stabbed her father — his cousin — and shot him in the head.

Hendrix then stabbed her mother 30 times, slashed her throat and shot her twice in their Sorrento home.

On Wednesday, 24 years later, it was Scott who would see Hendrix die, lying on a gurney in a Florida death chamber. After he was given a lethal injection about 6:11 p.m., he gasped his last visible breath about 6:16 p.m. and was pronounced dead at 6:21 p.m.

Perched at a podium in front of the Florida State Prison in Raiford late Wednesday and surrounded by family members, Department of Corrections officials and media, Scott said she has kept her parents in her heart and asked for the public to do the same.

“Thank you for allowing my parents to not be forgotten,” said Scott.

Prosecutors said Hendrix and his cousin, Elmer Scott Jr., 25, were arrested for breaking into a house in 1990. Scott accepted a plea deal that would keep him out of prison if he testified against Hendrix, who was offered a plea agreement of four years imprisonment and five years of probation. But Hendrix had other plans. A day before the trial, Hendrix killed Scott and then his wife, Susan Michelle Scott, 18, when she tried to intervene.

Hendrix was eventually convicted of the murders and sentenced to death. Shortly after the U.S. Supreme Court denied his last-minute request for a stay Wednesday afternoon, Rachel Scott and other family members sat in a white rectangular room and waited for the curtain to open to see Hendrix lying under a starched white sheet — with needles in his arms.

At 6 p.m., death penalty opponents, in a designated area in front of the prison, rang a bell to signal the oncoming death.

But Lisa Hunt, the younger sister of Elmer Scott Jr., said that the day had come for justice to be served.

“I just wish our parents could see (this),” Hunt said.

Hours before his scheduled execution Wednesday night, Hendrix ate a dish of pork chops with sausage gravy, biscuits, German chocolate cake and a Mountain Dew drink, according to a spokeswoman with DOC.

His final visitors were his parents and a Catholic spiritual advisor.

When asked if he had any final words, he replied “No.”